MY LOTTY

MY LOTTY: THE CRAYONS AND THE BOAT

When I met Serena, it was like approaching a perfect creature sculpted for the sea.A unique specimen of motorsailer, signed by Benetti sail division. An encounter, born from a fortunate series of coincidences, marked the beginning of an extraordinary adventure.

I had already worked successfully for the same client, embellishing the interiors of two previous boats with a chic and sophisticated touch, also designing a series of paintings in shades of blue and gold that had won over their discerning taste.

I understood that my work had been appreciated when her brother came to see me, to talk to me about a completely different boat.
“Come for an inspection,” he said, “and if you like it, I’ll buy it.

Its name was “Serena,” a name that had conquered me even before I knew it had been designed by the skillful pen of Laurent Gils. “Serena” by name and by fact, but soon it would wear a new name: “My Lotty,” in honor of Carlotta, the beloved four-legged companion of the owner. The project’s objective was clear: to transform Serena into a maritime charter experience, destined to enchant demanding guests in search of exclusive emotions.

To avoid wasting precious time, in a week I gave Serena a temporary look, attractive enough to attract bookings for the following summer. But the real work was yet to begin.
Over the days spent aboard Serena, immersing myself in her essence, I understood that the secret of success lay in respecting her identity. On the advice of the owner, I consulted with the captain, who told me, “You must be very careful, not only consider the owner’s taste; this yacht will have to work for years.Use soft colors that can appeal to everyone’s taste, practical objects, comfortable, washable, and durable fabrics. Furthermore, it is essential to divide the owner’s cabin to create a double cabin and replace the bathtub with a shower.”

I fully understood the importance of this commercial strategy. At the first meeting, I presented the project to the owner who complimented me, responding only with a cold “ok. proceed.”
I chased after him while he was already in the car and said to him: “Stop, look at me, you don’t like this proposal.”
“The boat is not just mine, we have to follow the captain’s requests.”
Hearing these words repeated, the owner lowered his gaze slightly, whispering, “Of course, I wouldn’t have wanted it like this.”
So, while the captain disagreed shaking his head, I invited him to my workshop at home.

Here, wandering among the thousand small things that build the magic of my work day after day, he lingered on the colored pencils that I always keep handy and said to me, “You know, I would like My Lotty’s cabins to be inspired by your crayons.”

Guided by passion and determination, I challenged conventions to realize the owner’s vision, while at the same time preserving My Lotty’s original essence. The captain’s advice and the owner’s requests created a creative tension for me, finding the perfect balance point, I transformed each cabin into a colorful story inspired by beloved crayons. Each cabin would have a different color, and each color would tell a story, harmonizing with the others to bring to light the strong personality of that boat that I had loved from the beginning. But that’s not all: faithful to my feeling of not changing the original conception of that masterpiece, I left the owner’s cabin with the two bathrooms intact.

As the work progressed, I constantly went back and forth from Palermo, where My Lotty was moored, staying on board from the early hours of the morning until late at night to ensure that every detail reflected my vision. Finally, My Lotty was ready for the photo shoot in its final version.

In the evening, the owner arrived, and he was enthusiastic: I wanted the crew to prepare something special for him on board, but not having organized for dinner, they opted for a quick pizza.
I stopped: I perfectly arranged every corner, diffused the scent I had prepared in every cabin to make the visit an unforgettable experience, placed bright cushions on the deck amplifying their light with the suggestion of candles.

“I waited for his return and saw him smiling as he watched people stop to photograph My Lotty in all its splendor.
At that moment, I realized it was exactly as he would have wanted it.”

I talked to him about the importance of the crew, and he invited me to stay another week to train them, to handle materials, objects, including the carefully designed gifts to be delivered to guests throughout the day, complete with accompanying cards to make every moment special.

Watching My Lotty set sail, I felt a deep sense of emptiness, but I was comforted knowing that a new project awaited me, and I was ready to fall in love again. Twelve years later, the owners have changed, but the furnishings and fabrics I designed are still perfect, testifying to the love I poured into making it so special. My Lotty will always remain my creature, 27 meters full of charm and meaning.

Small gossip note: My Lotty’s first client was Riccardo Scamarcio with his partner, Valeria Golino.